Future of Work

The Bleed from Speed: The Future of (Less) Work

Artificial intelligence and machine learning are advancing more rapidly than ever before. An AI system recently defeated the world’s best player of Go, an ancient Chinese strategy game significantly more complex than chess. Driverless cars have logged thousands of hours on public roads. AI means that productivity can continue to increase regardless of levels of employment.

Comparing Good Jobs to Good Classrooms: Essential Elements for Supporting People to Learn, Persist, and Succeed

Recently, I read an employer profile for the Kentucky-based materials manufacturer Universal Woods, written by Steven Dawson. Universal Woods is a manufacturer of hard surface panels and flooring headquartered in Louisville, KY, with 200 employees, and operations in Ohio, Australia, and Belgium.

Insights from Socializing the World of Work Initiative

The technological advances of the past 40 years have fueled the Fourth Industrial Revolution which has greatly impacted the modern workplace. The First Industrial Revolution used water and steam power to mechanize production; the Fourth Industrial Revolution will use robotics, automation, computing, and the internet to transform the nature of work forever. While technology has made us more productive, it has changed many of the types of jobs we do, and how we do them. What does this mean for K-12 educators? How can this inform how we define getting our students “college and career ready”?

Preparing the Workforce of the Future by Doing What Matters

By Van Ton-Quinlivan, vice chancellor for workforce and economic development of the California Community Colleges

Ready for the Robots? Let's Prepare Every Student for the Future of Work

Ready for the Robots? Let's Prepare Every Student for the Future of Work

Originally posted in Education Week's Learning Deeply blog on May 10, 2017.

How Lifelong Learning Can Help Grow and Keep Jobs in the United States

People notes coffee tea

Much ink has been spilled describing the rapid pace of change in the U.S. labor market and the resulting disaffection and frustration it has caused low-income and working-class populations across the country. Already, because of automation, the U.S. manufacturing sector now makes 85 percent more goods than it did in 1987, but with only two-thirds the number of workers. This is just the tip of the iceberg: according to Oxford University, 47 percent of workers in America “are likely to be substituted by computer capital” in the years ahead.

The Rise of the 1099 Economy: Who Really Benefits from Contract Work?

One trend to watch closely as we explore the future of work is the changing nature of the employer/employee relationship—particularly the fact that, legally, fewer people in the workforce can even be called “employees.” Independent contractors—or “1099” workers, named by the IRS form they file to report their income—make up a growing proportion of workers compared to prior years, with freelance acco

Automation is a Threat to Low-Income Workers, Unless the Education and Workforce Systems Can Change

This is the second post of the Future of Work blog series. 

Jobs for the Future of Work: Supporting Workers and Employers as Technology and Talent Transform

As I enter my third month as JFF’s President and CEO, it is becoming increasingly clear to me that in order to advance JFF’s mission of helping all young people and adults attain quality credentials and employment, we must think about our strategies and solutions within the context that the rapid changes and economic trends—such as the growth in automation technologies and contract-based work arrangements—are bringing to the workplace and to the very future of work in our society.

Almost 35 years ago, Hilary Pennington and Arthur White founded JFF to help: