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About Our Areas of Work
We organize our work into three areas to help low-income youth & adults:

Blog

Monday April 4, 2016
Two-thirds of students in community colleges are assessed as underprepared to successfully enter and complete college-level programs of study. For too many of these students, especially low-income, first-generation, and students of color, underpreparation stands between them and economic opportunity. Without a college credential, most people born into the lowest quintile of the national income distribution will remain stuck there throughout their lifetimes. For example, half of all black Americans born in the lowest income quintile remain there as adults. Black Americans who earn bachelor’s...
Tags: Credentials, Career Pathways, Developmental Education, Opportunity Youth
Tuesday March 29, 2016
There are startling statistics that we can no longer ignore. A child born into a family in the lowest income quintile has a 4% chance of moving into the top quintile. Half of black Americans are born poor and stay poor. Most black, middle-class children are downwardly mobile. These data points reflect the growing inequality, lack of economic mobility, and increasing numbers of Americans living in poverty and insecurity. Like many of you, Jobs for the Future is doubling our efforts to change this deeply troubling and painful reality in the land of opportunity.  At JFF we are committed to...
Tags: Career Pathways, Credentials, Summit, Economic Mobility
Monday March 7, 2016
We need a new word in the English language. It’s a combination of academic and career focused—“caredemic”? “acacreer’? Among education improvers, too much of the discussion I hear today poses an either or proposition—young people get career education through a two-year vocational or CTE pathway OR they go to college, which means heading to a four-year BA or BS. This language implies that the career-focused pathway happens only at community college and is about certification or an applied associate’s degree, while a “real” degree takes four years or much longer, happens at a liberal arts...
Tags: Career Pathways, Career and Technical Education
Tuesday November 24, 2015
Jogging along, on a treadmill at an easy pace, I turned the page of my InStyle magazine, and smiled. There, opposite a “How to Wear” editorial spread, was an advertisement—not for the latest boots—but for the XQ Super School Project Challenge. It wasn’t the first time I had heard about the Challenge. I would imagine that most people who work in education had heard that Laurene Powell Jobs was committing $500 million to the herculean task of rethinking high school. The XQ Super School Project invites the public (generally anyone who cares about education and the future) to throw out the...
Tags: Opportunity Youth, Student-Centered Learning, Career Pathways, Deeper Learning
Tuesday November 3, 2015
No workforce development strategy has the same track record as apprenticeship, which has proven to be one of the most effective ways to connect education to work since the middle ages. In recent years, this age-old model of training has been reinvented as an innovative new way to prepare people to fill high-demand jobs and address skills gaps in industries ranging from health care to manufacturing to information technology. On average, the starting salary for apprentices equipped with newly minted skills begins at $50,000—a respectable, livable wage in most major U.S. cities. This...
Tags: Workforce Partnership, Career Pathways, Manufacturing, Addressing Employer Needs, Credentials, Work-Based Learning, Employer Engagement, Apprenticeship