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About Our Areas of Work
We organize our work into three areas to help low-income youth & adults:

Blog

Thursday April 7, 2016
A professor is helping two students in a classroom
Principle 4. Additional academic support should be integrated with gateway college-level course content — as a co-requisite, not a pre-requisite. Principle Four opens the question of what needs to be done for students who enter college with skills so low that it is not likely they can benefit from default placement in a college-level course. The honest answer is that we don’t know. Whatever the eventual solutions, student supports will need to be a central feature. Principle Four focuses on “additional academic support,” but I argue that “additional support” needs to go far beyond the...
Tags: Credentials, Developmental Education, Dropout Recovery, Opportunity Youth
Monday April 4, 2016
Two-thirds of students in community colleges are assessed as underprepared to successfully enter and complete college-level programs of study. For too many of these students, especially low-income, first-generation, and students of color, underpreparation stands between them and economic opportunity. Without a college credential, most people born into the lowest quintile of the national income distribution will remain stuck there throughout their lifetimes. For example, half of all black Americans born in the lowest income quintile remain there as adults. Black Americans who earn bachelor’s...
Tags: Credentials, Career Pathways, Developmental Education, Opportunity Youth
Wednesday February 10, 2016
By guest
Originally posted on Andrus Family Fund's blog on February 5, 2016. In our last blog post, we identified the skills gap that contributes to America’s double digit youth unemployment rate. We also saw how grantee partner LeadersUp is closing the skills gap and connecting opportunity youth with career pathways. However, addressing skills alone cannot solve the workforce inequities we see today. While the Nation’s unemployment rate has improved, recent data shows that the unemployment rate for African American youth under the age of 20 is significantly higher than their white counterparts....
Tags: Opportunity Youth, Dropout Recovery
Tuesday November 24, 2015
Jogging along, on a treadmill at an easy pace, I turned the page of my InStyle magazine, and smiled. There, opposite a “How to Wear” editorial spread, was an advertisement—not for the latest boots—but for the XQ Super School Project Challenge. It wasn’t the first time I had heard about the Challenge. I would imagine that most people who work in education had heard that Laurene Powell Jobs was committing $500 million to the herculean task of rethinking high school. The XQ Super School Project invites the public (generally anyone who cares about education and the future) to throw out the...
Tags: Opportunity Youth, Student-Centered Learning, Career Pathways, Deeper Learning
Tuesday November 3, 2015
Each year, more than 600,000 individuals are released from state and federal prisons. Advancing policies and programs that give these men and women a second chance to put their lives back on track promotes not only justice and fairness, but also public safety. The path that these individuals take—successful reentry or recidivism—depends most on a single variable: full-time employment. Unfortunately, only 70 percent of adults in state prison and fewer than half of the juveniles who are incarcerated have a high school diploma or GED. Without this basic steppingstone to opportunity, the jobs...
Tags: Opportunity Youth, Reentry