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About Our Areas of Work
We organize our work into three areas to help low-income youth & adults:

Blog

Wednesday August 10, 2016
I recently read an article in The New York Times by Angela Duckworth entitled Graduating and Looking for Your Passion: Just Be Patient, in which she gives advice to new college graduates. For those who are not familiar with Duckworth’s work, she is an eminent psychologist who has helped to popularize the notion of “grit.” So, not surprisingly, she applies the same concept to the pursuit of a successful career; what’s key in her view is to foster and not to follow one’s passion, keeping in mind that it takes time; it also takes trial and error. This got me thinking about whether or not this...
Tags: Opportunity Youth, Dropout Recovery
Wednesday May 25, 2016
City Skyline
By Marty Alvarado and Lucretia Murphy Nineteen-year-old Jadareous Davis was about to graduate from high school and enter adulthood with little family support, outstanding debt, and few prospects for a job that provides a living wage. As the Washington Post story shows, Mississippi students like Jadareous are too often faced with crippling intergenerational poverty simply because of where they live. The Deep South offers the bleakest landscape for its youth, especially for African-American males. Mississippi, specifically, has the lowest median income in the nation and a poverty rate nearly...
Tags: Opportunity Youth, Dropout Recovery, Summit, Economic Mobility
Monday May 9, 2016
Today, more than ever before, youth voices are pushing agendas for change in education. Young people have some of the most valuable input when it comes to education, postsecondary success, and issues that affect low-income youth. They know that if any significant change is going to take place in the education sector, they have to take an active part in making it come to fruition. Luckily, youth don’t have to organize themselves. Youth-serving advocacy organizations are encouraging the young people to speak up about the issues that affect the way they learn and the way they plan for their...
Tags: Opportunity Youth, Dropout Recovery
Thursday April 7, 2016
A professor is helping two students in a classroom
Principle 4. Additional academic support should be integrated with gateway college-level course content — as a co-requisite, not a pre-requisite. Principle Four opens the question of what needs to be done for students who enter college with skills so low that it is not likely they can benefit from default placement in a college-level course. The honest answer is that we don’t know. Whatever the eventual solutions, student supports will need to be a central feature. Principle Four focuses on “additional academic support,” but I argue that “additional support” needs to go far beyond the...
Tags: Credentials, Developmental Education, Dropout Recovery, Opportunity Youth
Wednesday April 6, 2016
Students in a Math classroom
Principle 2: Enrollment in college-level math and English courses or course sequences aligned with the student’s program of study is the default placement for the vast majority of students. In plain English, Principle 2 states that most students should be placed in credit-bearing college courses rather than developmental education course sequences, even when their placement scores indicate that they will need additional supports to succeed in college-level courses. This practice is referred to as acceleration because it shortens or eliminates entirely the time a student spends in...
Tags: Credentials, Developmental Education, Dropout Recovery