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About Our Areas of Work
We organize our work into three areas to help low-income youth & adults:

Blog

Tuesday May 17, 2016
Paying for college just got easier, with the Obama Administration’s announcement of the 44 institutions chosen to participate in the Experimental Sites Initiative that will allow high school students to use federal Pell grants to pay for credit-bearing college courses. Currently, Pell grants—the most important source of federal financial aid for low-income students aspiring to a college education—are not available to high school students. This $20 million initiative will expand access to college courses for over 10,000 students at 44 colleges in 23 states.  This initiative will help support...
Tags: Early College, Dual Enrollment, Federal K-12 Policy, Federal Higher Education Policy
Monday May 9, 2016
Today, more than ever before, youth voices are pushing agendas for change in education. Young people have some of the most valuable input when it comes to education, postsecondary success, and issues that affect low-income youth. They know that if any significant change is going to take place in the education sector, they have to take an active part in making it come to fruition. Luckily, youth don’t have to organize themselves. Youth-serving advocacy organizations are encouraging the young people to speak up about the issues that affect the way they learn and the way they plan for their...
Tags: Opportunity Youth, Dropout Recovery
Wednesday April 27, 2016
By Anonymous (not verified)
Career and technical education appears to be enjoying a resurgence these days. From President Obama's Ready to Work Initiative and the Department of Labor's American Apprenticeship grants, to the California Career Readiness Initiative and the states participating in CCSSO's Career Readiness Initiative, hundreds of millions of dollars are pouring into CTE, and everyone seems to be talking about work-based learning. Should proponents of deeper learning be alarmed by this resurgence? Does it suggest a return to tracking poor and minority students into non-academic programs? Or does this moment...
Tags: Student-Centered Learning, Deeper Learning
Wednesday April 27, 2016
Ask three policy wonks what they think of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), and you'll likely get four or five answers. At recent meetings and conferences, experts have told me that ESSA "kills off No Child Left Behind, once and for all," and they've also told me that it amounts to "NCLB 2.0." I've heard ESSA called both a "game changer" and "the same old, same old." I've been assured that it symbolizes a renewed commitment to the principle of local control, and I've been assured that it's just a temporary stopgap measure, giving federalists a chance to catch their breath and plan for...
Tags: Student-Centered Learning, Deeper Learning, Summit
Thursday April 7, 2016
A professor is helping two students in a classroom
Principle 4. Additional academic support should be integrated with gateway college-level course content — as a co-requisite, not a pre-requisite. Principle Four opens the question of what needs to be done for students who enter college with skills so low that it is not likely they can benefit from default placement in a college-level course. The honest answer is that we don’t know. Whatever the eventual solutions, student supports will need to be a central feature. Principle Four focuses on “additional academic support,” but I argue that “additional support” needs to go far beyond the...
Tags: Credentials, Developmental Education, Dropout Recovery, Opportunity Youth