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About Our Areas of Work
We organize our work into three areas to help low-income youth & adults:

Blog

Tuesday March 22, 2016
Graduating students
By Joel Vargas and Hannah Smith Originally posted on the Getting Smart blog and on Huffington Post in the GenDIY series on March 12, 2016.  Hack: a clever solution to a tricky problem There is good news and bad news about today’s high school students. The good news is that more students are finishing high school. Graduation rates have increased over four years to a high of 82 percent in the 2013-14 school year. And as college credentials have increasingly become a necessity for getting onto a career path with good wages, high school graduates get the message. Aside from a few dips during...
Tags: Early College, Dual Enrollment
Monday March 7, 2016
We need a new word in the English language. It’s a combination of academic and career focused—“caredemic”? “acacreer’? Among education improvers, too much of the discussion I hear today poses an either or proposition—young people get career education through a two-year vocational or CTE pathway OR they go to college, which means heading to a four-year BA or BS. This language implies that the career-focused pathway happens only at community college and is about certification or an applied associate’s degree, while a “real” degree takes four years or much longer, happens at a liberal arts...
Tags: Career Pathways, Career and Technical Education
Monday February 29, 2016
Black history month affords an opportunity to look backwards to glean lessons to leap forward. Any historical assessment of access to postsecondary education for black Americans will find that there has been tremendous progress. Aspirations for higher education among black young people are high, suggesting that they have great faith that degrees from our nation’s higher education institutions will provide opportunity for economic advancement. On the whole their faith is well grounded. But there is compelling evidence that it takes more than a college degree to advance in today’s economy....
Tuesday December 15, 2015
In 1992, I was a first-year law student at the University of Texas School of Law. Cheryl Hopwood, a white woman, sued the law school because she wasn't accepted as a student that year. She argued that she would have been accepted if it weren't for the blacks and Latino/a students being enrolled under affirmative action. She won her lawsuit. The approximately 50 of us (out of 300) who were black and Hispanic were on display for three years, having to defend our place in the law school despite our scores, grades, and achievements. The 250 white students were assumed to have earned their place...
Thursday November 5, 2015
By guest
Guest blog by Dane Linn Originally posted on the Business Roundtable Blog. This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Higher Education Act, legislation that cemented U.S. colleges and universities as a foundation for individual success, a dynamic economy and national prosperity. Today, as Congress begins to consider renewing the law, one thing bears keeping in mind: That was 50 years ago! Students come from different walks of life than they did a half-century ago, and they are demanding a different kind of education. The U.S. economy has fundamentally changed, and employers are asking their...
Tags: Federal Higher Education Policy