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About Our Areas of Work
We organize our work into three areas to help low-income youth & adults:

Blog

Tuesday September 19, 2017
Recently, I read an employer profile for the Kentucky-based materials manufacturer Universal Woods, written by Steven Dawson. Universal Woods is a manufacturer of hard surface panels and flooring headquartered in Louisville, KY, with 200 employees, and operations in Ohio, Australia, and Belgium. To many, Universal Woods embodies the idea of a  “good employer” – the type of employer that sees the worker as a trusted partner and creator of value for the business – and Dawson describes the work environment as one that nurtures the practice of learning from mistakes and working collaboratively,...
Tags: Student-Centered Learning, Deeper Learning, Future of Work, Developmental Education
Tuesday November 24, 2015
Jogging along, on a treadmill at an easy pace, I turned the page of my InStyle magazine, and smiled. There, opposite a “How to Wear” editorial spread, was an advertisement—not for the latest boots—but for the XQ Super School Project Challenge. It wasn’t the first time I had heard about the Challenge. I would imagine that most people who work in education had heard that Laurene Powell Jobs was committing $500 million to the herculean task of rethinking high school. The XQ Super School Project invites the public (generally anyone who cares about education and the future) to throw out the...
Tags: Opportunity Youth, Student-Centered Learning, Career Pathways, Deeper Learning
Wednesday December 17, 2014
Originally posted on Getting Smart on December 16, 2014  By Clare Bertrand & Scott Emerick Choosing a college, selecting a course of study or training program, and launching a career path are not easy choices for anyone and the stakes for these decisions are highest for low-income students. There are currently 6.7 million 16- to 24-year-olds in America who are not currently in school or working. We are part of a growing movement calling these young people "opportunity youth." The great news is that despite their disconnection from education and employment, these young people have...
Tags: Career Pathways, Opportunity Youth, Dropout Recovery, Blended Learning
Wednesday June 12, 2013
Moving Beyond Grouping
In the June 9 article, "Grouping Students by Ability Regains Favor in Classrooms," the New York Times reports that “ability grouping has re-emerged in classrooms all over the country” and cites increases in the percent of teachers grouping students by ability. With over 650 readers chiming in with comments, it is clear that ability grouping is a topic people have strong opinions about. Teachers interviewed in the article who express a desire to move away from “teaching to the middle” are on the right track in terms of wanting to instruct in a way that recognizes learner difference. But it is...
Tags: Student-Centered Learning
Tuesday October 30, 2012
In Sara Mosle’s Oct. 27 piece in The New York Times’ Opinionator column, Teaching Lessons, she writes: “Teachers can’t go it alone. They need sustained training and support using empirically tested methods in concert and collaboration with one another. This is how schools succeed.” This simple declaration is not only powerful, but true. There are a number of factors that enable a professional development (PD) experience of real value for educators—Ms. Mosle gets to the heart of the matter in writing about the difference she experienced when she went to a school that “took PD seriously.” Like...
Tags: Student-Centered Learning